About Us

Portland Film Review was founded in January 2017 by two friends and cinephiles from Portland, Oregon and Portland, Maine and emerged from the desire to give our film criticism a formal and public platform. We soon added a third member, and the editorial team has now published close to 200 posts, including film reviews, articles about film theory and the film industry, best-of lists, and festival coverage. In July 2020, the editorial team launched PFR Weekly, a podcast which dives into the cultural contexts and technical accomplishments of individual films.

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Nathan Modlin

Co-founder, editor, contributing writer

Focuses: Film adaptations; international film (German, Austrian, French); Jewish film; film theory

Nathan Modlin (he/him/his) is a writer and critic from Portland, OR. He is interested in international film, especially German, Austrian, and French, and in the intersection between film and literature. In addition to writing reviews of a wide range of films, from Coco (2017) to BlacKkKlansman (2018), Nathan has published critical articles on Scorsese’s auteur theory, Madeline Anderson’s protest films, and why there’s no such thing as “high” cinema.

His favorite films include The Third Man (1949), Rear Window (1954),  Les 400 Coups (1959), The Trial (1962), Dr. Strangelove (1964), Chinatown (1974), Mulan (1998), and Les Intouchables (2011).

Nathan is currently a PhD candidate in German literature at the University of Chicago, and has previously studied at Reed College and the Universities of Vienna, Tübingen, and Oxford. His research has been supported by a Fulbright Grant. He has also published a translation in Plain Sight and is on the fiction board at the Chicago Review.

 

Jane Vaughan

Co-founder, editor, contributing writer

Focuses: The role of gender; contemporary film; documentaries; interviews with local filmmakers

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Jane Vaughan (she/her/hers) is a journalist from Portland, ME. She is interested in studying the role of gender in film and often writes about contemporary films, including documentaries. She is fascinated by how and why stories are told and how experiences and emotions are conveyed, whether that be through art, text, or film. Her reviews include Unbelievable (2019), Midsommar (2019), and Free Solo (2018). In addition, she enjoys conducting interviews with local filmmakers, including Juliette Sutherland and Kendra Smith.

Jane’s favorite films include No Country for Old Men (2007), The Fighter (2010), True Grit (2010), Nightcrawler (2014), Spotlight (2015), Manchester by the Sea (2016), and The Hours (2002).

Jane is currently working on her Master’s in Journalism at the Medill School of Journalism in Chicago. She previously studied at Wellesley College and the University of Oxford.

 

Devin McGrath-Conwell

Editor, contributing writer, podcast producer
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Devin McGrath-Conwell (he/him/his) is a writer, director, and educator from just outside Portland, ME. He is interested in studying stories that interrogate ideas of masculinity, American culture, and all things horror. These also happen to be the stories he enjoys writing and directing. In addition to these concepts, his writing for this site often focuses on the inner workings of the entertainment industry, the lineage between old and new films, and, of course, awards season. 

Beyond this site, his scripts have been produced in the form of a short film he also directed, Locally Sourced (2019), and the ongoing web series Lambert Hall (2020-). Starting in fall 2021, he will begin an MFA at Emerson College in Writing for Film and Television. 

Devin’s favorite films include Casablanca (1942), Diabolique (1955), Blue Velvet (1986), The Silence of the Lambs (1991), Hero (2002), Hot Fuzz (2007), and Arrival (2016). 

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Disclaimer: To the best of our knowledge, all media (including film stills, posters, quotations, and links) found on this website fall under Fair Use guidelines for critical commentary and non-profit educational purposes.

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